The Belief Beneath My Passion

February 27, 2019 by David Ameryun2
IMG_0231-e1549925282564.jpg?fit=1200%2C675&ssl=1

My lifelong passion for all things Green.

If you follow my career or listen to my webinars and presentations at all, you will hear me proclaim my life-long passion for nature, the environment and how that led me to green building and living walls as outlets for positive change. If you engage my consulting and innovation services at any level you will quickly hear how I see all created things as connected and therefore, the underpinning of my passion and motivation.

I am also an active seeker of spiritual growth and read extensively on the subject. Naturally that leads me to spiritual teachers who understand the connection between nature ( all creation ) and the Universe. Today I was reading a daily meditation from one of my favorite teachers, Fr. Richard Rohr, and felt like the reading was spot on for illuminating my own passion and how it comes through in my work.

I hope you enjoy this segment and the notion of “the greening of the self” and maybe you will even look up Richard to hear more of this type of information. The following is an excerpt from today’s meditation.

 

The Natural World

Kinship with All Life Thursday, March 15, 2018
Joanna Macy vividly reconnects our seemingly separate selves with nature, both present and past:
The conventional notion of the self with which we have been raised and to which we have been conditioned by mainstream culture is being undermined. What Alan Watts [1915-1973] called “the skin-encapsulated ego” . . . is being replaced by wider constructs of identity and self-interest—by what philosopher Arne Naess [1912-2009] termed the ecological self, co-extensive with other beings and the life of our planet. It is what I like to call “the greening of the self.” . . .
Among those who are shedding these old constructs of self . . . is John Seed, director of the Rainforest Information Centre in Australia. One day . . . I asked him: “You talk about the struggle against the lumber companies and politicians to save the remaining rain forests. How do you deal with the despair?”
He replied, “I try to remember that it’s not me, John Seed, trying to protect the rain forest. Rather, I am part of the rain forest protecting itself. I am that part of the rain forest recently emerged into human thinking.” This is what I mean by the greening of the self. It involves a combining of the mystical with the pragmatic, transcending separateness, alienation, and fragmentation. It is . . . “a spiritual change,” generating a sense of profound interconnectedness with all life. . . .
. . . Unless you have some roots in a spiritual practice that holds life sacred and encourages joyful communion with all your fellow beings, facing the enormous challenges ahead becomes nearly impossible. . . .
By expanding our self-interest to include other beings in the body of the Earth, the ecological self also widens our window on time. It enlarges our temporal context, freeing us from identifying our goals and rewards solely in terms of our present lifetime. The life pouring through us, pumping our heart and breathing through our lungs, did not begin at our birth or conception. Like every particle in every atom and molecule of our bodies, it goes back through time to the first splitting and spinning of the stars.
Thus the greening of the self helps us to reinhabit time and our own story as life on Earth. We were present in the primal flaring forth, and in the rains that streamed down on this still-molten planet, and in the primordial seas. In our mother’s womb we remembered that journey, wearing vestigial gills and tail and fins for hands. Beneath the outer layer of our neocortex and what we learned in school, that story is in us—the story of a deep kinship with all life, bringing strengths that we never imagined. When we claim this story as our innermost sense of who we are, a gladness comes that will help us to survive.

Joanna Macy, “The Greening of the Self,” in Spiritual Ecology: The Cry of the Earth, ed. Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee (The Golden Sufi Center: 2013), 145, 147, 155-156.


2 comments

  • Rosa

    March 14, 2019 at 11:01 am

    Hello, I want to work in your company on a voluntary basis, can you offer me anything?
    a little about me:https://about.me/rosa.mann/

    • David Ameryun

      March 16, 2019 at 8:11 pm

      Thanks for your inquiry. Im still building the site and may have missed this before. Please email us directly and we can discuss opportunities.

Comments are closed.